Your FBI Today: The Run Amock Cops

FBI MaskYou must always keep in mind when thinking of the FBI is that a handful of members of Congress, including my Congressman William Keating, seeking to find out information on the Boston Marathon Terrorist Attack of April 15, 2013, had to go to Russia. The FBI refused to deal with them. In addition, when Congress wanted information on the attack the FBI told it to take a walk. This seems not to bother other than a few like myself that these cops can operate in secret and not be responsible to anyone other than themselves.

What brings this to mind today is a USA Today report that tells us that the FBI authorized its informants to commit 5,600 criminal acts in 2011.  What about those years other than 2011? Here’s what the article states: “USA TODAY asked the FBI for all of the reports it had prepared since 2006, but FBI officials said they could locate only one, which they released after redacting nearly all of the details.” 

Imagine that! Our vaunted FBI filed 7 yearly reports and has lost six of them. It must have either a dismal record keeping ability or it just plainly lies. Either one would cry out for it to be reformed. But our timid Congressman shy away from the reality of an out of control group of cops.

One of the big media bamboozlements we’ve encountered is the suggestion that the Boston FBI office and the Whitey Bulger situation was unique. We are supposed to believe all the rest of the FBI was fine, it was only Boston that was corrupt and not only that, it was only one agent John Connolly. Well, maybe two, his supervisor, John Morris also fit that bill; but as we know nothing happened to Morris because in part he was a source for Boston Globe reporters.

We’ve been tricked into  believing it was only in Boston because we’ve had a chance to take a small peek into the Boston office while what has happened elsewhere in the country remains off-limits. What we saw in Boston did not make us too happy since it appeared many reports that were filed had no relation to what had actually happened.

When we first learned that the FBI had both Whitey Bulger and Steve Flemmi, two top-level gangsters, as informants and that they were allowed to commit crimes it seemed to send many into Greater Boston into a tizzy. We wondered how that could ever have happened until we learned of the Top Echelon Informant program where it is routinely done. Now we see it is of a much grander scale than anyone could imagine.

Now looking at that 5,600 figure we see what John Connolly did is something quite routine. “Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, . . . , ” the article notes. And if there’s one thing we’ve learned from the Wolf Hearings and the Whitey trial, most of the agents give tacit approval to their informants criminal acts and don’t make a record of them.

Like the news item yesterday that tells of a Mani Chulpayev, an FBI informant for FBI Agent Dante Jackson, who helped a gangster hit squad set up a person to murdered. At first the FBI agent tried to keep Mani from helping the local police, then denied Mani was an informant before admitting it, but said he was being carried off the books.  Guess what happened to Agent Jackson? “The FBI admitted its agent is under investigation but has refused multiple requests for further comment.” 

I pointed out in my book Don’t Embarrass The Family that the prosecution of Connolly was an attempt to pretend all was right in the FBI except for that one rogue agent. Common sense told us this could not be true since what Connolly did was open and notorious and approved. Every SAC, ASAC, supervisor, agent, and even some file clerks in the Boston office knew Whitey was a Top Echelon Informant. The FBI transfers its agents on a continuing basis, that knowledge traveled throughout the Bureau up to the highest levels.

How often have we heard “under investigation” and “refused comment” from the FBI. Facing that stonewalling even in the face of the 2013 terrorist attack, where can we turn? It seems there is nowhere to go. The FBI has become a big black hole from which no light comes forth. If there is any agency in government where that should not be the case it is in our law enforcement arm but sadly like a child without supervision the FBI continues to run amock.

18 comments for “Your FBI Today: The Run Amock Cops

  1. Henry Barth
    January 17, 2014 at 1:11 pm

    Here’s another great cop abuse article. At least they had to pay up. War on drugs indeed!

    Man given multiple enemas after traffic stop awarded $1.6 million
    http://dailym.ai/1dxS3to

  2. khalid
    December 30, 2013 at 8:50 pm

    MS:

    If you are interested in US Government involvement with the drug trade, pick up a copy of “The CIA, and, the Politics of Heroin” by Alfred McCoy. McCoy, who teaches at UW Madison WI, is a top-notch scholar, and, and a fine writer. Get the latest addition. That way you can check the verity of things you read on the internet.

  3. msfreeh
    December 29, 2013 at 6:53 pm

    I knew the Swiss Police were trained by the FBI at Quantico
    2 stories

    1st story
    see link for full story
    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/naked-women-secretly-spied-taped-gym-swiss-police-staffer-article-1.1560725

    Naked women secretly spied on, taped, in gym — by Swiss police staffer
    Entire volleyball team exposed while undressing.

    Sunday, December 29, 2013, 11:42 AM

    2nd story
    FBI Workers Suspected of Secretly Taping Teens in Dressing Room

    April 20, 2009

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517222,00.html

    Two FBI workers are accused of using surveillance equipment to spy on teenage girls as they undressed and tried on prom gowns at a charity event at a West Virginia mall.

  4. NC
    December 28, 2013 at 2:43 pm

    Baker knows Connolly was framed. He’s seen the abuse first hand. What is his lament? Should the FBI be beyond criticism? Should people ignore the political investigations of the IRS? Should the public accept the lies about Benghazi? Should abusive prosecutions by the DOJ be condoned? The federal Government has immense shortcomings and problems. The solution for Congress is to withhold all funding for the FBI until they come clean. Apply the same principle to the State Dept. on Libya. The American people don’t need a secret police. Sunlight is the best disinfectant. Where is the transparency the Chief Executive promised? All we get is Nixon style intrigue.

  5. khalid
    December 28, 2013 at 1:10 pm

    MS:

    I never heard of Ruppert. Richard Ross (TI) was a principal in the affair. He claims his source for cocaine was a Nicaraguan who worked with Oliver North on the Contra program. A former DEA agent named Richard Levine wrote a non-fiction essay titled “I volunteered to arrest Oliver North.” Check it out.
    All that contra stuff is old news. The story that’s been largely unreported is the bigger operation that took place in Guatemala. It was run right out of the national airport, Aurora. I was at the Hotel Antigua the night Reagan beat Carter. The military honchos threw a big fiesta that evening with fireworks, and, marimba bands. They knew the brakes were off.

  6. msfreeh
    December 28, 2013 at 12:40 pm

    Matt: Just in case you are bored this weekend.
    We brought LA Police department narcotics detective Mike Ruppert to speak at Bates College where he discussed how he was approached by the CIA to distribute crack and heroin into the ghetto in Los Angeles to help destabilize their community by driving up the crime rate. Watch Mike Ruppert confront the CIA Director
    on youtube here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSi5CHe-ZDc He told the Bates College audience this same CIA program called Amadeus is happening in every major American city. In 2010 an award winning documentary was made about Mike Ruppert called COLLAPSE that film critic Roger Ebert called on his top 10 film list. You can watch it on youtube here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdO2Xh51Q-U

  7. msfreeh
    December 28, 2013 at 4:13 am

    FBI informants murder Border Patrol agent.

    ATF Agent Sends Shockwaves Across Internet With Explosive Allegations About ‘Fast and Furious’ and Brian Terry’s Death
    Dec. 27, 2013
    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/12/27/atf-agent-sends-shockwaves-across-internet-with-explosive-allegations-about-fast-and-furious-and-brian-terrys-death/

    • mtc9393
      December 28, 2013 at 10:43 am

      ms:

      Guess what answer the FBI will give is asked about it?

  8. msfreeh
    December 28, 2013 at 3:34 am

    Jeez…I come to you blog ready to post this story and find that you scooped me. Ugh!
    see link for full story

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/27/fbi-otherwise-illegal-activity-report_n_4506385.html

    FBI Allowed Informants To Commit at least 5,939 Crimes In 2012

  9. Henry Barth
    December 27, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    The system is amok, not only the cops:

    http://m.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/08/12/130812fa_fact_stillman

    Taken
    Under civil forfeiture, Americans who haven’t been charged with wrongdoing can be stripped of their cash, cars, and even homes. Is that all we’re losing?

    • mtc9393
      December 28, 2013 at 10:56 am

      Henry:

      I read that article before and may have blogged about it. The cops actions are outrageous. The idea the route is a road over which drug dealers travel as giving probable cause for a stop would mean everyone driving Route 95 which runs from Miami to Maine can be stopped without more.
      It’s worse than you think. There’s case going to start next February in Boston federal court against three probation officers. They are charged with mail fraud which was the sending out of rejection letters to people who the federals believe were more qualified than those they hired. Because three of them in supervisory positions worked on the interviewing of candidates and selecting the new probation officers, they were called an enterprise under the racketeering statute (RICO) – and the criminal purpose of the enterprise was to increase the budget of the probation department.
      Stay in Ireland; the laws in the U.S. border on the absurd and they are applied arbitrarily as is shown in the article you sent me. And by the way, don’t use the federal banking system for anything since any money put into a bank account gained by illegal means can result in a charge called money laundering charge, now one of the federals favorite tools. Win a few bucks playing the number or having a lucky weekend playing the NFL games and then putting the money in the bank makes you subject to a 20 year money laundering charge. Yes, you are right the whole system is amock and sadly it keeps getting worse – by the way, what is worse than amock

  10. December 27, 2013 at 5:29 pm

    That’s not an argument Bakes.
    Try again please.

    • mtc9393
      December 27, 2013 at 5:47 pm

      Ernie:

      Bakes is just using the old FBI trick of attacking the messenger and avoiding the issue. I responded to him suggesting that is the case.

  11. Richard Baker
    December 27, 2013 at 3:02 pm

    One major comment: If a person does not read your missive[s] they are uninformed; If a person does read your missive[s] they are misinformed!

    This is a quote from Mark Twain: “If you do not read the newspaper your are uninformed; If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed.” Sounds like Mark Twain has it right long ago about the present newspapers.

    The DA’s office has skeletons in their own closet. So, step back and reflect on what has gone on over the years under the Norfolk County DA’s office. Do not through stones if you live in a glass house…..

    • mtc9393
      December 27, 2013 at 5:46 pm

      Richard:

      Your comment reminded me of the time when the FBI was accused by the MA state police of leaking information to Whitey and Stevie. It denied doing it and commenced an investigation. The conclusion of the investigation was that the MA State Police did not like the FBI and probably had some bad detectives working for it. It never addressed the issue. It seems to me you can’t escape the FBI’s training of avoiding the issue and trying to blacken the person who dares suggest anything is wrong with it. It’s a strange habit. But it doesn’t cut the mustard here although it may look good in a 302 circulated in house among agents.
      I’ve reflected on the Norfolk DA’s office and find nothing that has happened that has been hidden or that has not been put out for public consumption. If you know of something that would contradict that, please let us all know.
      If I have given out misinformation, I’d suggest rather than taking the FBI approach of making innuendos suggesting I have something to hide, tell me what misinformation I have put out there. That is the idea of having a comment section so that if I am wrong on something you can set out some facts correcting it. The time worn FBI trick of switching the subject and attacking the messenger with conclusory assertions is something we are on to.

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