Category Archives: Massachusetts Justice System

In examining this case it is necessary to look at different aspects of the justice system to give people a better understanding of what is going on.

Can MacKenzie Con Saylor?

(1) out of stepKevin Cullen has an interesting column in the Boston Globe about Eddie MacKenzie from South Boston who wrote a book telling how he was associated with Whitey Bulger and managed to get it published.  It was called. “Street Soldier: My Life as an Enforcer for Whitey Bulger and the Boston Irish Mob.

The book is written by MacKenzie and Phyllis Karas. The latter has found a nice gig for herself co-writing books about Whitey as other authors have done. Another of her books is the one with Kevin Weeks called: “Brutal, Untold Story of My Life Inside Whitey Bulger’s Irish Mob.” She has an upcoming book about Whitey again with Kevin Weeks called: “Hunted Down: The FBI’s Pursuit and Capture of Whitey Bulger” about which Weeks has little knowledge.

But that hasn’t deterred Karas because Cullen tells us if Whitey is to be believed he met MacKenzie only once and otherwise had nothing to do with him.  Which, as I’ve noted before, since both are gangsters you can’t believe either one.

The Absurdity of FBI Agent John Connolly’s Incarceration: Part Three

Here’s what I don’t get. How any right thinking can person believe justice is served by having John Connolly rot in prison?  To bring that about the Department of Justice (DOJ) attorneys had to literally make deals with evil.

Connolly joined the FBI in 1968. He got in through a hook. No, it wasn’t through Billy Bulger’s help as some media mavens would have you believe. Billy was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives at the time who had little pull in Washington, DC at the time and none with the FBI. It was through a friend of his father, John W. McCormack, who happened to be Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.  McCormack picked up the phone and J. Edgar Hoover knowing on what side his bread was buttered opened the door for Connolly.

It was probably through the same connection that he returned to the Boston office of the FBI in 1973. McCormack had retired by that time but you can rest assured he still maintained his relationship with the next speaker, Carl Albert, his long time right hand man. Connolly stayed with the FBI in Boston until he retired in late 1990.

The Absurdity of FBI Agent John Connolly’s Incarceration: Part One

“Mean bastards,” is what I answered a person who asked me why the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the FBI want John Connolly to die in prison. That’s my explanation for what is going on. They have no reason other than they are vindictive people who have the power to work behind the scenes to continue the unwarranted imprisonment of him.

It’s not that John Connolly knows anything that could hurt them; even if he did, few, if any, would believe him since he has lost all credibility in the public eye after the incessant hammering he has taken in the media and books by malicious people using him as a foil for hurting others. A tragic part of John Connolly’s plight is that he has yet to fully grasp after all these years in prison that he was betrayed by the FBI. He knows he did the job that he was supposed to have done; he knows the FBI knows that is what he did; because of his brain washing by that Bureau he cannot understand that it is because he did the job that the FBI had to turn on him and try to destroy him.

The Bum’s Rush of FBI Agent John Connolly in Federal Court: Part One

You know Frank Salemme was one of the big hit men during the gang wars of the 1960s in Boston according to both him and his buddy Stevie Flemmi. Both men were indicted for blowing up an attorney’s automobile. They fled the area. Flemmi was caught in New York City by FBI Agent John Connolly, returned to Boston, incarcerated in Walpole prison for 16 years, and finally released in the late 1980s. He eventually became the leader of the New England Mafia. Not a nice guy by any definition of that word.

He testified against Agent Connolly at his trial in 2002. He blamed Connolly for him having been shot at a Pancake House in Saugus. He testified Flemmi told him the gangsters were paying money to Connolly; he testified that he gave Flemmi money to give to Connolly; and he said he got information from Flemmi which Flemmi said came from Connolly. Pretty good information that Connolly is corrupt to any juror who is paying attention.

Prosecutorial Abuse of the Grand Jury: The Silence of the Media

(1) constitutionThe Boston Globe has advised us that the Boston federal prosecutors have brought Catherine Greig back to Rhode Island from the Midwest because the federal prosecutors want to question her about the assets of James “Whitey” Bulger.  I know the newspapers are not supposed to be mouthpieces for the government but given the very close relationship between that newspaper and the Boston federal prosecutors what is written has the ring of truth.

What I found disheartening in reading that newspaper report is the failure of the reporter to question what the federal prosecutors were doing. Perhaps she is too close to them to do so. It becomes doubly so when another reporter uses the first’s story to add his two bits. He too because of his closeness leaves out the heart of the story.

This is why reporters and prosecutors should not have such symbiotic relationships. They cannot see when their sources are acting in violation of the Constitution. They report as if what they are doing is fine and proper. If these reporters are telling the truth then we are seeing a huge abuse of our Constitution by the prosecutors. It should be decried. It is not a matter to be taken lightly when those who are supposed to be guarding our liberty are intent on stomping upon it.

Federal Torture: A Prosecutor’s Lament: “Oh to be Kim Jong-un”

(1) Kim Jong-UnDon’t ever get on the bad side of a certain type federal prosecutor. If you do and the prosecutor has unlimited powers like Kim Jong-un you will spend the rest of your life in prison. Even your family may be dragged in after you, or, if not imprisoned, impoverished.

Fortunately most federal prosecutors don’t have the power to pursue people endlessly to satisfy what borders on an irrational compulsion to destroy. Usually there are restraints upon them. Sometimes it is the media that will point out how it was never intended that for crimes not punishable by death that people do life in prison on the installment plan. Other times with the change-over in local U.S. Attorneys the newly installed leader will calm the waters and turn the prosecutor’s attention to other subjects.

As unusual as it seems, there may be an occasion like we see now where a prosecutor is in his sixties, he has done nothing but prosecute all his life and knows no other pursuit, has friends in the Department of Justice some who have been there almost 50 years who support him, who has been a source and friendly with the local media keeping them on his side providing them with inside information, his media friends end up with secret grand jury minutes, and his boss seems to either lack control or be oblivious to his crusade.

Florida Justice: The Lengthy Imprisonment of Innocent People

At this point in time, a man who has been wrongfully convicted lingers in a Florida prison. To be frank, no one seems to care. That’s Florida justice for you. It may be the Sunshine State but there’s little sunshine for those caught up in its criminal system.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a cheerleader for this person. Some want to light candles to him, not me. To be truthful I have mixed feelings toward him none of which are complementary.

It’s a relatively easy story to understand how he ended up in his nether world of being still locked up. He was an FBI agent who worked in the FBI’s Top Echelon Informant (TEI) program. His job was to find criminals highly connected with top gangsters and wine and dine them so that they would give him information the FBI could use against the big bad guys.

He ended up cuddling up to two of the worst criminals; there were others equally bad, but he brought these two particularly vile ones, Stephen Flemmi and Whitey Bulger, into the FBI’s program. For fifteen years as an FBI agent he worked them taking information from them and protecting them from others in law enforcement. He was doing the job the FBI wanted him to do. From my point of view what he was doing was wrong even though sanctioned by the FBI.

Boston Cops and Unsolved Homicides: Is There Something Rotten in Boston’s Finest?

smoking-gunThe Boston Herald over the last week or so has made much ado about the unsolved homicide cases in the City of Boston. A headline on July 28 read: “Boston lags behind U.S. in solving murders.”

The first few lines read: The Boston Police Department is carrying a grim ledger of 336 unsolved murder cases from the past 10 years — a period that saw the city consistently lagging behind the national average for cracking slay cases despite repeated changes in strategies and leadership, a Herald review found. The stunning total of unsolved cases encompasses 2004 to 2013, . . . killed 628 people across the dozen neighborhoods patrolled by Boston cops”  (my emphasis)

The article then went on to show the homicides occurred at a much greater rate in black neighborhoods: “Black men were slain at 10 times the rate of white men” and “More than two-thirds of the city’s murders were committed in Roxbury, Mattapan and Dorchester” which are predominately black areas.

Then it put a little bit of a hit on the Boston Police: “Of the city’s 628 victims, 410 were black males and 38 were white males. But police solved only 38 percent of the murders of black males compared to 79 percent for the slayings of white men.” Overall, it noted that “police arrested, charged or formally identified suspects in 47 percent of the homicides.